Aug 29 2010

What Now? Resetting the Economy for the Next 50 Years

In The Great Reset, Richard Florida asks the question that all policy makers should be asking: what happens after a Depression?

This shockingly simple question opens the door to look at history as a guide for what is to come for the U.S. economy. Florida reviews two different  economic slowdowns in American history, the Long Recession of the 1870s, and the Great Depression of the 1930s, and compares those to our most recent financial meltdown of 2007-present.

While there are a number of accounts of what went wrong, and whose fault it was that the economy tanked (Big greedy banks! The dollar-hungry, exchange-rate fixing Chinese! Government’s insatiable quest for higher levels of home ownership! Homeowners’ binge-spending, house-as-ATM profligacy!), Florida largely leaves the causes of the crisis aside. This is really for the better. Florida is a metropolitan sociologist – primarily concerned with what makes cities, and what makes them better.

But, Florida hits on a larger theme that has so far been ignored by most Great Recession books: what now? Continue Reading »

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Aug 25 2010

Solving the Content Challenge Will Move the Web Forward

Published by under curation,marketing,technology

The magazine industry is running a new campaign that declares that people surf online, but “swim in magazines.” On the one hand, it’s a rather obvious way to distinguish the (in some circles) questionable future of magazines. On the other hand, the ads are right. Continue Reading »

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Aug 04 2010

Is Your Marketing Program Threatened with Colony Collapse Disorder?

Published by under marketing

In 2006, bees started disappearing at an unprecedented scale. Entire hives would suddenly be abandoned by all of the worker bees.

The phenomena was so dramatic, and so startling, it was dubbed “colony collapse disorder.”

Since 2006, scientists have studied colony collapse disorder to determine why hives that were thriving suddenly started failing. The condition spread to hives in Europe, and possibly in Asia.

If you run marketing programs, you may see the similarities between bees and your own work. For long stretches, marketing programs can run in a pretty predictable way. Inputs of campaigns, media buys, research and targeting produce predictable results in terms of leads, sales, or brand awareness. Inputs lead to outputs. Just like bees use pollen to create honey.

But sometimes, suddenly, and for no obvious reason, marketing programs fail. This is “marketing collapse disorder.” And it’s happening now at an alarming rate. Continue Reading »

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