Nov 21 2016

Trump v. Clinton: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and the Future of Work

Published by under Uncategorized

In 1943, Abraham Maslow published his, “Theory of Human Motivation.” Fundamentally, Maslow believed that human beings worked to achieve and sustain their needs according to a fairly predictable hierarchy.

Seen through the lens of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, the election results make so much sense. Democrats were not enthusiastic about a Clinton candidacy because she spoke to building a sense of community – of being Stronger Together. This appeals to our need for “Love and Belonging,” and many people voted for Clinton because she represented this need. The need for Love and Belonging manifests itself in ideas like:

  • The need for safe spaces, where minorities and historically oppressed groups can express their perspectives without fear of persecution

  • The need for women to have a voice in the political establishment, and to believe that any qualified person would be judged on their qualifications for the presidency, and not by their gender

  • The need to see yourself as part of the great American experiment, where people of different creeds and colors assemble under a shared vision of freedom and opportunity

In order for each individual to reach their fullest potential, it is clear that we need to feel a sense of love and belonging. We can’t be successful at developing a sense of strong self-esteem without it.

But, Trump spoke to a more fundamental need – the need for Safety. Maslow describes the need for safety as expanding beyond just physical safety, to also encompass economic security, and to feel safe from danger or threats. Trump voters feel the need for Safety with ideas like:

  • The need to protect us from the threat of violence from illegal immigrants who have infiltrated the country

  • The need to create jobs that provide economic stability, so that each of us can keep ourselves safe from harm

  • The need to have affordable healthcare, with reasonable and predictable insurance premiums that provide for physical safety

The biggest lesson for any political candidate is that they must speak to the lowest common denominator need on Maslow’s hierarchy that a majority of the electorate will relate to.

A political campaign that helps people believe that they can become self-actualized, and achieve their highest and best dreams, can only win if the majority of the electorate believes that they are safe; that they belong; and that they have self-worth.

On the other hand, if the majority of the electorate does not feel confident in having food, clothing and shelter, then a campaign focused on self-actualization is doomed.

So, within this context, we can see how our current electorate maps against the need for Safety and the need for Love and Belonging:

The Safety coalition included:

  • Whites with a high school education, who are unsure about their economic future

  • Evangelicals, who see their entire way of life as under attack with secular values proliferating

The Love and Belonging coalition included:

  • College educated whites, who have experienced the benefits of globalization and technology advancements

  • Minority voters, who expect to have a seat at the table of power and decision-making for the future of the American experiment

  • 18-25 year olds, who believe that they will inherit the poor decisions of previous generations and deserve to have a say in decisions made now

Just by looking at these coalitions, you can see how fundamental the issues were to each of these coalitions; for the Safety coalition, electing Trump was existential. The stakes could not be higher – he represents their only hope to maintain their lives in a relatively stable way. By contrast, the urgency for the Love and Belonging coalition was just not as fundamental. Which resulted in a poor turnout for Democrats – across the country, almost 6 million fewer votes were cast for Clinton than were cast for Obama in 2012.

Perhaps the biggest challenge with this election result is that Trump is not going to be able to wholesale move jobs back to the U.S. Advanced industrialized economies will lose over 7 million jobs to technology in just the next four years. By contrast, the U.S. has lost 5 million jobs to offshoring….in the 15 years from 2001-2016.

As software eats the world, we a 21st century economic model to deal with the accelerating automation of work.

No responses yet

Jul 01 2011

Welcome, Mashable visitors!

Published by under Uncategorized

If you have come over from my post on Mashable on The End of Demographics, welcome!

Take a peek around. You might find some things interesting – here’s some content curation ideas, mobile thoughts, of course, you’ll see a lot about social media marketing.

No responses yet

Jun 30 2011

How to Leverage Social Login (Part 1)

Published by under Uncategorized

This post is cross-posted from the Janrain Blog.

Social login is a simple concept, with profound implications. When a user logins into any website using an existing online identity, there is immediate value for both the the user and the website.
For users, the ease of logging in without filling out a long profile form and the convenience of not needing to remember passwords is a clear benefit. For websites, among the many benefits is the information that users share offers an opportunity to make the site experience more relevant.
From a technical standpoint, the process of integrating Janrain Engage to enable social login into your site is very straightforward. Most of the effort in the integration will be around determining the best possible user experience for your community.
Defining Reasons to Register
First, and most important, you must clearly define why a user would register on your site in the first place. This critical step is often the most overlooked. Your users are rational economic actors, and as such, will evaluate the trade-offs of every exchange. They will weigh what they are giving up (personal information) for what they are receiving in return. Even when there is no money involved, your users still need to find more value in what they receive from registration, than the personal information they are giving up.
There are a number of ways to provide value for a registration. Here are some ideas to start you off:
  • Premium content: Some websites keep high-value content behind a registration wall. There are many ways to build value into content, like creating long-form reports, high-value videos, or early access to regular content. For content-driven sites, this is the easiest way to build value for registered users.
  • Contests and promotions: Short-term contests with valuable prizes are a great way to build registrations. Remember that the prizes don’t necessarily have to be expensive, but they must be valuable for your audience. An in-person meeting with a famous singer doesn’t cost anything, but has a huge value to fans.
  • Community: Access to message boards, comments, or your branded social network are all valuable add-ons to your users’ experience – and are sometimes the primary experience of your website. In those cases, it’s natural to register in order to contribute.
The type of experiences you put behind a registration will dictate the type of users who will register. Your most loyal fans will want access to premium content; more casual users may be interested in a contest (depending on the prize). Consider your goals in relation to the 1/9/90 rule: in general, 1% of users create content; 9% will comment on those creations; and 90% will be passive readers.

Bicycling.com offers compelling reasons for users to register and create a profile, like access to a training log.

Registration Process
Next, consider the actual experience of registering on your site. Where should the registration button be placed? Are there events that launch a registration flow automatically, like when a user clicks “Submit” after writing a comment. The launch experience will determine how likely a user is to abandon their registration. Make sure the benefits of registering are clearly defined right away in that process.
Finally, consider how much work it is for your user to complete their registration. You want the process to be as seamless as possible. This is your opportunity to leverage all of the data from a social login. If possible, do not require your users to create a separate “Display Name.” If there are certain fields that you require, like email address, only offer identity providers that provide that data to you.
If you must collect additional fields, they can be automatically pre-populated using the social data you have collected. Any additional information you require could cause your users to abandon the registration process. So, it’s crucial to only require items that are actually required. Don’t lose the good data they are providing by harassing them for one more item as it will cause drop off.

Go Try It On pre-populates social data into their registration form, allowing users to finish their registration quickly.

So far, we’ve discussed the whys and hows of user registration. Next week, I’ll talk more about how to make advanced registration and profiles more useful for your users, and for your business.

No responses yet

Jun 21 2011

How to Leverage Invite Friends

Published by under Uncategorized

This post is cross-posted from the Janrain Blog.

Fundamentally, people are attracted to social technologies because they like sharing their lives and experiences with friends. In fact, the ability to share is one reason that Jeremiah Owyang has said that email was the first social network. Before Friendster or Tribes, people emailed cute cat videos to each other.

That desire to connect and share with others is the driving user need for Janrain’s Invite Friends functionality. Invite Friends is different than Social Sharing. Where a social share event is a broadcast message to all social connections, Invite Friends allows the user to send a targeted message to selected friends. It’s the difference between a “come one, come all” poster to the Friday night party, and a party invitation delivered through the mail. More targeted, more personal.

This functionality can be used for a number of purposes, like sharing a deal or offer, telling friends about an achievement, targeting a sensitive message to the best connections in the user’s network, or asking a friend to join the user in a new social experience.

Janrain offers Invite Friends functionality for Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, Google, Yahoo, and Windows Live (Hotmail). The end result in social networks is a network message (e.g. a Facebook Message or Twitter Direct Message) from the user to their friend; for Google, Yahoo and Windows, the end result is an email from the user to their contact’s email.

The Invite Friends functionality is very easy to implement. It’s based on Janrain’s Contacts API. In order to implement this functionality, you must first ensure that you have asked for the correct permissions from the user. In Facebook, the user has to authorize your site to access their contacts. In email providers, the user authorizes access to their email address book.

The contact list that is returned from Janrain is normalized and available in XML or JSON. If the user has connected multiple identities, contacts from multiple networks can be displayed. Now, you can render those contacts in the way that makes the most sense for your users.

There are a two common options for rendering contact lists.

You can queue them up to be auto-populated from a keystroke trigger, like Gmail:

Invite Friends - Auto-Populated Email

Or you can import photos and allow users to check which contacts they want to communicate with:

Invite Friends - Import photos

Make sure to allow the user to select all or none of their contacts easily, in addition to toggling a selection for an individual contact easily. Also note that Janrain won’t return any information from a Facebook user’s friend that the friend has not authorized for the user to access.

 

Another way to leverage your user’s social graph is through a Refer a Friend experience. This is a highly targeted way to maintain the exclusivity of an experience, by limiting access to social referrals. You can enhance the velvet rope feeling by limiting the number of friends that can be referred.

Inviting friends with a targeted message is important functionality to consider for higher value, or more sensitive experiences that don’t make sense for users to broadcast to their entire network. Not surprisingly, they are also more effective marketing messages than anything you could send directly from the brand. Open rates on messages and emails from known contactsare 43% higher than from email marketers, and transaction rates are 2.5 times higher.

Janrain has detailed documentation on using the Contacts API to start this process, and please contact us if you have any questions on how to build your own Invite Friends experience.

No responses yet

Jun 13 2011

How to Leverage Social Sharing

Published by under Uncategorized

This is cross-posted form the Janrain Blog.

One of the most common use cases for Janrain Engage is to promote your website content on external social networks through the use of our social sharing functionality. Sharing has come a long way from constrained widgets. Janrain offers unmatched flexibility and tracking for social sharing – from simultaneous network broadcasts to sharing from a mobile device.

Go Try It On implementation of Janrain Engage social sharing in iOs

Fortunately, the process of implementing Janrain’s social sharing on your website is very straightforward. There are three main components that you have to define: the activity that triggers a sharing event, the content within the publish activity, and the links back to your existing analytics package for return visitor tracking. Let’s look at them individually.

The Activity Event

The process of a social share starts with a user activity. Most of the time, the activity will be a click event, on a sharing icon, button, or favicon. But, a triggered share can be prompted from any event. Some possible sharing events include:

 

  • Reaching the end of an article: when a user has read an entire article, they are more likely to share it than a user who read just the first paragraph. You can implement a sharing trigger once the user scrolls to the bottom of a page. Here, Kodak allows users to share their projects.Kodak implementation of social sharing with Janrain Engage
  • Commenting on a piece of content: when a user comments on a piece of content, the publication of that comment can trigger a recommended share event. In this case, the user is not done with the comment flow until they decide whether they want to share the comment or not. Here, the Bakersfield Californian allows users to share their comments on articles.Bakersfield Californian implementation of social sharing on a comment with Janrain Engage
  • Completing a sequence of events: a user may want to share when they have accomplished something on your site. Whether its getting to the end of a checkout process, viewing a video series, or interacting with advertiser elements on your site, every unique experience is potentially a shareable experience. Here, AMC allows users to choose which suspect is the killer on the TV show “The Killing.”AMC implementation of social sharing on TV show The Killing, using Janrain Engage

 

The Publish Event

Publishing a social share is the act of submitting that shared content to the social networks where the user has connected. Janrain’s sharing allows the user to post to multiple networks simultaneously, which increases overall sharing, as users link to multiple networks with one publish event. In addition, Janrain allows you to retain some control over brand perception by allowing users to publish immediately, or to put social shares into a moderation queue, and publish them later.

In order to finalize a publish event, you have to determine a few things about what defaults the user should share. You’ll need to determine what the title and description of the event that the user shares should say. Most commonly, those will be driven by the page-level information you are already using, and pulled directly from the HTML on page. Of course, custom messaging is also possible. So, your content strategist should be involved in how social content is messaged for maximum clickthrough and SEO benefits.

We also recommend that you prompt your users with a message to share to their network. Of course, the user will have the ability to customize the message they send out to their network, but this is a case where smart default copy can influence the tone and color of how your content is received by the user’s social graph. Default copy can be static or dynamic based on the page content or template, and could be the page or article title, and can also include an action from the user, like “I love…” or “I just read…” This prompts the user to think about the context they want to provide for their friends and contacts.

The Analytics Setup

Of course, the goal of users sharing your content is to drive more traffic back to your site. You will want to ensure that you are accurately tracking the return traffic from a sharing event.

Janrain’s social sharing works with any analytics package. First, you must establish the proper campaign tracking identifier to append to the shared URL. In general, you will want to track several components, such as Campaign Name, Referrer, and Source, R. Most websites define the Campaign Name as “SocialMedia,” Referrer as “SocialShare,” and Source as the share location (e.g. “Checkout” or “ArticleEnd”).

The campaign tracking append is embedded within the share trigger, as part of the URL that is shared. Simply place it at the end of the URL reference as a hard coded element in the share activity. That way, regardless of what specific page the user is on, the campaign tracking information will be automatically added.

We also recommend that you shorten the URL after campaign tracking identifiers are appended. Janrain provides easy URL shortening through our rpx.me service. Now, you’re all set to allow users to share content in a way that adds more user profiles and more social media analytics onto your site.

Janrain’s customers see an average of 13 return visitors for every link shared. With a well thought-out social sharing strategy, you can dramatically increase your site traffic from social media, and drive a more qualified referral visitor at the same time. Janrain’s strategic servicescan help you articulate the most valuable sharing experience for your users.

No responses yet

Feb 07 2011

Beckett-Style Ad Agency Pitch

Published by under marketing,Uncategorized

This really happened to a friend of mine, who wishes to remain anonymous.

It’s sad (or hilarious, actually), but true – this stuff happens every day. You have to love the creative process to keep going back for more punishment.

One response so far

Feb 01 2011

It’s Not My Fault You Are New to Quora

Published by under Uncategorized

This is cross-posted from the Quora Review, a blog about Quora.

A lot of people – especially new users – think Quora is hard to use. And the sign up process is not as easy as it could be (as David Pogue recently pointed out). But Quora’s initial wonkiness actually helps it be a better site.

Because when something is great, you should have to work a little bit to get it. Continue Reading »

No responses yet

Jan 28 2011

Groupon Locusts and the Coming Small Business Apocalypse

Published by under Uncategorized

Here’s my latest post on the White Horse Blog.

At the dawn of 2011, the hottest trend in social marketing is the “daily deal” Web site, of which Groupon is the poster child. I’m not restricting my ire to Groupon alone here, but since they are the best known, you can take every instance of “Groupon” in this post to mean “any daily-deal Web site.”

Groupon is terrible for small business. Continue Reading »

22 responses so far

Nov 30 2010

Welcome, Social Media Examiner and TechCrunch Visitors!

Published by under Uncategorized

If you’re visiting this blog for the first time, welcome!

I wrote a guest post on Social Media Examiner on curing social media management pains just before gorging my face with turkey and giving thanks for the internet (among other things).

And, then my post on social media content curators was referenced in Guillaume Decugis’s post on social media content curation on TechCrunch.

If you’re interested in connecting on social media strategy, I work for White Horse, and we do amazing work there. Tons of digital marketing resources in the White Horse resource center, too.

So, if you’re poking around here, you might enjoy:

-White Horse landscape review on social media management platforms

The challenge of increasing quality for marketers

-Why Quora is great for content marketing

-And, why marketing ninja Seth Godin is wrong about content curation

-Lots more digital marketing thinking on the White Horse blog

-And subscribe to the RSS feed for all the ongoing goodness.

See you around!

No responses yet

Apr 30 2009

Are You in the New Now?

Published by under social media,Uncategorized

A quick multiple choice question:

What does it mean that you can now tweet with your thoughts?

A. A media-savvy PhD candidate knew how to get some attention
B. Resistance is futile—you will be assimilated
C. Twitter is mainstream
D. Twitter is passé—social networking via thought is the new, new thing Continue Reading »

No responses yet

Next »