Feb 18 2011

Downy Blows A Huge Social Media Opportunity

Published by under marketing

This is cross-posted on the White Horse blog – go there for all types of digital marketing goodness.

Recently, Downy fabric softener and Macy’s bedding department sponsored an event where comedian Mike Birbiglia slept in a Macy’s store window display for a week. People all over the world could watch “Mike in the Window” on Downy’s Facebook page, and see videos of him trying to sleep.

If you’re asking “why?” right about now, you are not alone. Continue Reading »

One response so far

Feb 15 2011

How Social Media Marketers Lie

Published by under marketing,social media

There are a lot of things that get my goat – but people that claim that social media is solely responsible for getting social media results is probably the worst.

In fact, there’s an entire marketing campaign ecosystem that goes in to pushing consumers into social channels, and then, if it’s good, they will share it with their friends.

That’s the subject of my new webinar with Lisa Osborne, White Horse’s Director of Media Services. Lisa and I approach marketing campaigns with an integrated mindset from the start – and we don’t get bogged down in territoriality between what is paid and what is social.

We talk through the benefits of this approach, and how to structure your own marketing efforts this way in our new webinar – which you can join for free tomorrow!

Register for the big event, and I look forward to the conversation!

No responses yet

Feb 07 2011

Beckett-Style Ad Agency Pitch

Published by under marketing,Uncategorized

This really happened to a friend of mine, who wishes to remain anonymous.

It’s sad (or hilarious, actually), but true – this stuff happens every day. You have to love the creative process to keep going back for more punishment.

One response so far

Feb 01 2011

It’s Not My Fault You Are New to Quora

Published by under Uncategorized

This is cross-posted from the Quora Review, a blog about Quora.

A lot of people – especially new users – think Quora is hard to use. And the sign up process is not as easy as it could be (as David Pogue recently pointed out). But Quora’s initial wonkiness actually helps it be a better site.

Because when something is great, you should have to work a little bit to get it. Continue Reading »

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Jan 28 2011

Groupon Locusts and the Coming Small Business Apocalypse

Published by under Uncategorized

Here’s my latest post on the White Horse Blog.

At the dawn of 2011, the hottest trend in social marketing is the “daily deal” Web site, of which Groupon is the poster child. I’m not restricting my ire to Groupon alone here, but since they are the best known, you can take every instance of “Groupon” in this post to mean “any daily-deal Web site.”

Groupon is terrible for small business. Continue Reading »

22 responses so far

Nov 30 2010

Welcome, Social Media Examiner and TechCrunch Visitors!

Published by under Uncategorized

If you’re visiting this blog for the first time, welcome!

I wrote a guest post on Social Media Examiner on curing social media management pains just before gorging my face with turkey and giving thanks for the internet (among other things).

And, then my post on social media content curators was referenced in Guillaume Decugis’s post on social media content curation on TechCrunch.

If you’re interested in connecting on social media strategy, I work for White Horse, and we do amazing work there. Tons of digital marketing resources in the White Horse resource center, too.

So, if you’re poking around here, you might enjoy:

-White Horse landscape review on social media management platforms

The challenge of increasing quality for marketers

-Why Quora is great for content marketing

-And, why marketing ninja Seth Godin is wrong about content curation

-Lots more digital marketing thinking on the White Horse blog

-And subscribe to the RSS feed for all the ongoing goodness.

See you around!

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Nov 07 2010

Trust in MSM Falling, in Blogs Climbing. Is Anyone Surprised?

Published by under reflections,social media

By now, the idea that blogs and mainstream media create a more complete media ecosystem is well established amongst bloggers.

But, it’s still frighteningly absent in the minds of most journalists.

Now don’t get me wrong – journalists will let bloggers make their own research easier by sorting through thousands of documents, digging into stories that don’t get play in the MSM, and pulling interesting blog threads into the big leagues when the story merits it.

But that doesn’t mean that journos think of themselves as part of the same information system as bloggers. By and large, journalists have been focused on saving their own dying newsrooms, which means protection, stonewalling, and entrenchment.

The scary thing is that mainstream press exposure still pushes so much of the context and nuance of a topic. This was apparent in this past Monday’s Op-Ed page of the New York Times. David Brooks wrote (presciently, given that the election was not even concluded) about how the Republicans would move their economic agenda forward once they took the House.

In that column, Brooks does his readers a disservice – not because he is wrong on the facts – but instead because he is wrong in the context and nuance.

Brooks mischaracterized the new health care law provision requiring businesses to file a 1099 form for purchases over $600. Here’s the passage:

The new health care law has a provision that forces companies to file a 1099 form to the I.R.S. every time they pay more than $600 a year for goods or services from any individual or corporation. If you’re a freelancer and you buy a laptop from an Apple store, you have to file a 1099. If you spend more than $600 per year with FedEx, you have to file a 1099. Republicans are going to make this an early target (for repeal) — an example of the law’s expensive interference in business life.

All of these facts are true – there is a new law. But, it is unlikely that his readers know that this new provision will take effect in 2012, but before it does, another law takes effect in 2011. That law will exempt credit card purchases from this type of 1099 reporting.

Therefore, buying a laptop from the Apple Store would place no additional burden on the freelancer, provided they use a credit card for that purchase (when was the last time anyone you know used cash or a check for a purchase totaling $600?).

There are literally hundreds of articles online that discuss how these two regulations go hand-in-hand. Brooks’s piece grossly overstates the burden this will have on small businesses and freelancers, and unfairly legitimizes the point of view that this section of the recent health care needs to be repealed.

For journalists to thrive in the digital age, they need to be able to use the blogosphere for research, yet still be able to get complete, quality information. Otherwise, already-shaky trust of the media will continue to erode, even as we continue to build greater trust in bloggers.

Personally, I get more than 90% of my news from the blogosphere. How credible is your news consumption? And where is it from? Let me know below.

One response so far

Oct 15 2010

Fast Company’s Influence Project Can’t Track Influence

Published by under social media

The proliferation of social media has discombobulated all traditional forms of measuring influence. PR practitioners are among the first to realize this, because suddenly, their jobs are radically more complicated. Instead of just mainstream media journalists and producers, suddenly there are renegade bloggers, YouTube video creators, and Tweeters that all can drive people to action.

The old forms of PR don’t work in this context: a Rolodex of a few hundred people (and yes, there are still some dinosaurs that have Rolodexes) is not going to cut it against millions of influential Facebook accounts.

The world has shifted, but the tools have not kept pace. Klout is perhaps the most robust service for measuring influence yet, and that only looks at one outpost: Twitter.

So, the come on I received in my inbox recently was enticing: “How influential are you online? Click to find out!”

The possibilities are exciting. Perhaps there was some new algorithm to analyze social media presences. I wondered if a new site would use cookies to see which recommendations I left across the web were influencing purchase decisions.

So, I clicked. Continue Reading »

No responses yet

Sep 29 2010

Attention Marketers: Stop Trying to Ruin Quora

Published by under social media,technology

If you haven’t spent time on Quora, then you’re missing out. That is, if you like to hang out with smart people and discuss interesting topics. If you don’t like those things, then you’re not missing anything. Continue Reading »

No responses yet

Sep 26 2010

Stylebot Gives Users Control to Eliminate Display Advertising

Published by under technology

If you’re like most marketers, you buy your digital display advertising on a CPM basis. But, what if you found out that your thousand impressions were really only 700? Or 500? That is a real possibility with the new Chrome extension, Stylebot. Continue Reading »

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