May 18 2010

Game Mechanics: The Most Important Online Tactic You’re Not Using

Published by under marketing,technology

Total read time: 5 minutes

Games have been around for thousands of years. But while Go and Chess are complicated (and have even been proven to correlate with intelligence), for most of history, games have not been taken seriously. Until video games came along. In the span of 30 years, a great gaming industry was built. Nintendo, Electronic Arts, Sony, Atari, and Microsoft owe billions of dollars in revenue each year to games. The video game industry is now worth more than $18BN (incidentally, that’s more than the movie industry). And Zynga, the social gaming company that created Farmville and Mafia Wars on Facebook, went from a valuation of $1BN last year to $3BN in February, to $5BN in April. Continue Reading »

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Mar 30 2010

Google Chrome Adds Translation Bar By Default

Published by under technology

Today I noticed something new on a Spanish language site: a toolbar asking me if I wanted to automatically translate the page into English.

This is the type of functionality that makes me get warm fuzzies for Google. Oh, and it brings the Star Trek universal translator and Douglas Adams’ Babel Fish one step closer to reality. Continue Reading »

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Mar 29 2010

Google Will Lose the Social Wars…And That’s OK

Published by under social media,technology

Google was built on search. It was not built on social. And, to thrive in the space, you have to have social running through your veins.

But, in their fight for social relevance, they will force the other players to play fair. So, thanks, Google! Continue Reading »

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Jan 12 2010

Google To China: Not In My House

Published by under marketing

Google has decided to allow uncensored search results in China.  But, the interesting part is why they decided to do so.  When Google started their Chinese site, in 2006, they came under a lot of criticism for allowing the Chinese government to censor the search results.  At the time, they decided they would rather operate in a less-than-ideal fashion than forgo the huge Chinese market altogether. Continue Reading »

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